Density Widget

Online Source of Data
Free Online Source of Data

Before sequestration, opening this data portal was fun and full of potential, it lies on the screen today a dead digital thing (2010)

<iframe src=”http://www.dataplace.org/widget/google/display/map?width=600&amp;year_select=1&amp;thematic=13&amp;uid=158&amp;centerX=41.393294288784865&amp;pl=x75740&amp;height=400&amp;zl=6&amp;centerY=-78.0029296875&amp;tc=olive&amp;bt=2&amp;legend_outside=1&amp;title=Population%20density%20(people%20per%20square%20mile)&amp;cid=113813&amp;font_size=12&amp;legend_on=1″ width=”455″ height=”303″ frameborder=”0″ marginwidth=”0″ marginheight=”0″></iframe>

Like many others data sources available to the ordinary person sites like this offered a sense of capacity for knowledge. It might offer a vast array of possible insights into urban demography or the social characteristics and vital statistics of a place you know well.

Given a foundation of veracity at the source, one or more people can gain the opportunity to become persuasive on an issue, but no longer.

In the case presented above, the number of people in 2000 aggregated on a per square mile basis using zip code boundaries. U.S. Census Tracts and other boundaries are available, but zips hold the geography better at the community scale.

I expected comparisons to 2010 would be fun to explore and free. No longer. The data for sale industry has become powerful.

When vast amount of information like this becomes available, the first question is a simple one.

What do I really want and need to know?

Following a reasonable period of explorations, our bonded rationality is exposed. Once we are sure we know what we know, a better questions arise.

Urban density offers a direct route to human success. The city extends the biblical metaphor of the ark to the earth itself.

A main issue: The data is available.  Have a look.  Here and here:

American FactFinder

Census Business Builder

Census Explorer

Easy Stats

My Congressional District

QuickFacts

U.S. and World Population Clock

1 thought on “Density Widget”

  1. This hybrid of the Fannie Mae site is welcome and equally easy to use at first glance.

    Questions:

    Why does the last cohort cut from 2,300 and shoot up to almost 160,000 people per square mile. Seems to me this is where it gets interesting. I would like to know of the zip location that yields the upper end “per square mile”. but left with tracking one zip at a time through NYC as the logical place to look.

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